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If you (a) are a huge dork, (b) are fairly lazy and have thought of being a “mad scientist or something” for Hallowe’en because you still have that labcoat and goggles from first year chem lying around somewhere, and/or (c) own or have access to a pet, you can quite easily construct a “real” scientist costume that incorporates your companion animal. This is probably only a good idea if you’re going to be staying home and answering the door. It also helps if you can cope with no one knowing what your costume is meant to be—though they should be able to figure out that you’re a scientist, at the very least.

Here are my suggestions. Obviously I’m going to be Schrödinger, myself.

If you are a cat “owner”:

If you are a dog owner (hopefully you’ve trained it well):

If you have a guinea pig:

If you have fish (please don’t take them trick-or-treating):

If you own finches, pigeons, iguanas, or, um, barnacles:

  • Charles Darwin

If you have mice or rats (ideally, as pets, not pests) (also I originally typed “rice or mats”):

  • Pretty much anyone, even just a generic scientist

If you’ve successfully domesticated a giraffe:

If you’re one of those people who insist on having a pet rock:

If you can afford a domestic fox:

If you own an exotic pet:

  • Sorry, you’re a douchenozzle.

If you’ve got a horse:

  • Why would you be a scientist when you could have the best headless horseman costume?

Not recommended as a costume: any fruit fly researcher.

 

 

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ResearchBlogging.orgElementary school students—even high school students—learn some fairly trite truisms about the scientific method that often aren’t clearly linked to the experimental results that are presented in textbooks as The Truth. A new paper in PLoS Biology makes a link between the codebreaking game Mastermind and teaching scientific reasoning skills to young students, in a method that I think both shows the broad applicability of inductive reasoning and makes the steps of the scientific method more than just a flowchart. (more…)

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