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Posts Tagged ‘cats’

If you (a) are a huge dork, (b) are fairly lazy and have thought of being a “mad scientist or something” for Hallowe’en because you still have that labcoat and goggles from first year chem lying around somewhere, and/or (c) own or have access to a pet, you can quite easily construct a “real” scientist costume that incorporates your companion animal. This is probably only a good idea if you’re going to be staying home and answering the door. It also helps if you can cope with no one knowing what your costume is meant to be—though they should be able to figure out that you’re a scientist, at the very least.

Here are my suggestions. Obviously I’m going to be Schrödinger, myself.

If you are a cat “owner”:

If you are a dog owner (hopefully you’ve trained it well):

If you have a guinea pig:

If you have fish (please don’t take them trick-or-treating):

If you own finches, pigeons, iguanas, or, um, barnacles:

  • Charles Darwin

If you have mice or rats (ideally, as pets, not pests) (also I originally typed “rice or mats”):

  • Pretty much anyone, even just a generic scientist

If you’ve successfully domesticated a giraffe:

If you’re one of those people who insist on having a pet rock:

If you can afford a domestic fox:

If you own an exotic pet:

  • Sorry, you’re a douchenozzle.

If you’ve got a horse:

  • Why would you be a scientist when you could have the best headless horseman costume?

Not recommended as a costume: any fruit fly researcher.

 

 

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Update: cat boredom

I’ve added to the collection of homemade cat toys I’ve been assembling for Palu. An unexpected windfall arrived in the form of a bag of plastic Easter eggs—you know, the kind that has two halves so you can take it apart and put chocolate inside it. The egg shape gives them some interesting kinetic properties, i. e. they roll around in unexpected patterns on linoleum. This turns out to be mesmerizing for Palu, who has almost crashed into several walls while pouncing on plastic eggs.

Having found a stash of polyester stuffing, I also made a couple of catnip pillows out of an old sock—simply cut the sock into two sections, stuffed each with a bit of the stuffing and a pinch of ‘nip, and sewed them shut. So far, they have been ignored, although my sleepier cat Luta was huffing one earlier today, while Palu was too busy begging to be let outside to give them more than a cursory examination. I’m pretty sure there’s more than enough catnip in the toys to interest them—I can smell it myself—but they continue to spurn my efforts to amuse them.

My sister pointed out that the best toys are the ones you steal for yourself, so now that the house is strewn with them, maybe Palu will be able to entertain himself.

Gratuitous cat picture:

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Bored.

Palu, one of my two cats, is easily bored. As a result, he spends the three hours before every mealtime mewling obnoxiously for food. He also picks fights with the other cat and knocks things off of counters. I try to let him go outside as much as possible, but he sometimes gets in fights with the neighbourhood felines and will probably start spending less time outside as it gets colder. Since I’m doing the unemployed-and-living-with-my-parents thing, I’m bored too. So I’ve decided to kill two birds with one stone, and make Palu some cat toys.

First, and simplest, is a ball of tinfoil. Palu bats it around and chews on it; I will need to make a new one fairly regularly, I think. But it holds his attention for about two minutes at a time, and, if it’s especially close to dinnertime, I basically have to throw it at him to get his attention.

A step up: you know those envelopes with the plastic windows? They make an excellent crinkly sound! I tied a string around the middle of one and dragged it around for Palu to chase. Verdict: he’s more interested in it when I dangle it in the air rather than when I drag it along the ground. As before, he doesn’t seem interested in interacting with it when I’m not there to “animate” it. And when I tried getting him to chase it about half an hour before dinner, he lasted a few minutes before fixing me with a contemptuous glare and yowling, then stalking into the kitchen.

Hence, another step up: I dug up some of the old craft supplies from my childhood, glued a bunch of colourful feathers to a wooden bead, and tied some twine to the whole thing. I hung this off of a hat rack, and Palu started batting it and nibbling the feathers of his own accord. When I swung it around he went pretty insane, and even attacked it after I’d put it down. It’s now lost a few feathers. So, tentative success.

A small dose of catnip also occupied him for a good while, but I don’t think I want to drug him every day. Laser pointers are out, because they make Palu a little too hyperactive and terrify my other cat, Luta (who alleviates his boredom by sleeping). Future projects might include a stuffed toy (with a little catnip inside) and perhaps some bouncy balls if I can find them. Anyone have other cat amusement ideas?

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